Gin
Safari

Welcome to my most unique and intriguing Gin Safari, where you will embark on a journey across the world to sample some of the finest divine libations I have stumbled across during my more adventurous years.

Each spirited fortification that hail from the humble juniper berry is perfectly paired with complimenting botanicals and garnishes for your pleasure. Please sit back & relax your expedition is about to begin.

Yours Sincerely

Chadwick Smithfield

Sojurn 1
New York. USA.

Brooklyn Gin 40%

Crisp, clean and balanced, Brooklyn Gin offers bright fruit notes supported by a bold juniper backbone that lingers through the smooth dry finish.

Sojurn 2
Winchester. UK.

Winchester Gin 44%

With 25 medieval botanicals commonly used in food and medicine in the period; one for each Knight seated at the round table with King Arthur himself on the throne at the head of the table represented by Juniper.

Sojurn 3
Paris. FRANCE.

G’Vine Floraison 40%

Smooth and well balanced in the mouth, G’Vine is luscious and defnitely less harsh than any other gin.

Sojurn 4
Marrakech. Morrocco.

Saffron Gin 40%

Crisp, clean and balanced, Brooklyn Gin offers bright fruit notes supported by a bold juniper backbone that lingers through the smooth dry finish.

Sojurn 5
Jakarta. Malaysia.

Opihr 40%

Opihr opens your senses to the rich aromas of the ancient spice route.

Join us on an adventure of gins throughout the world, with a selection of 5 premium gin and tonics from our Encyclopedia Gin & Tonica. Each perfectly paired with a complimenting botanical and garnish and served alongside a selection of bar snacks.

£29.99

Ideal to share & great for groups

6 delightful facts about gin

Gin is English – not Dutch. Genever, a malted spirit that is essentially light whisky with juniper, is the juniper distillate of the Netherlands. Gin was developed in London and is a unique and much purer spirit.

Faced with government acts that seemed poised to stamp out gin production, Londoners stages a mock funeral for Madame Geneva in 1736.

At one time there was a working gin still in one out of every four habitable structures in London.

In 1721, Britain consumed 3.5 million gallons of gin.

At Yalta, President Roosevelt complained that there were no lemons to make twists for the martinis. Stalin had a lemon tree flown from Georgia that day.

Hogarth’s famous etching, Gin Lane, was not meant to show the evils of drinking, but the evils of drinking gin. It was one of a pair. The other was Beer Street and showed London as he envisioned it consuming beer instead of gin. Here the citizens were a perfect picture of health, as morbid obesity was considered healthy at the time.